Course Descriptions

Not all courses described will be offered during any one academic year. Students should consult semester schedules and registration information to select courses that reflect their interests and that will allow them to meet graduation requirements.

Unless a course is designated as a first year course, it requires the completion of the courses taken in the first two evening semesters of law school. Those courses are Civil Procedure, Contracts, Lawyering Skills & Values I & II, Property, and Torts. These prerequisites are not separately listed in the course descriptions below.

If a course has additional prerequisites or corequisites (which might include Constitutional Law I or Criminal Law), those are listed as part of the course description. Prerequisites and corequisites cannot be waived. Students are responsible for ensuring they have taken the prerequisites for any course or are enrolled in the corequisites for any course. Failure to have taken prerequisites and corequisites may result in involuntary withdrawal from a course, with a concomitant loss of credits and possible delay of graduation.

American Bar Association rules limit students’ eligibility for online and other distance learning courses. A student cannot take such a course until he/she has completed 28 credits. Students are then limited to no more than 4 credits in any semester and no more than 12 such credits toward the J.D.

Note: A student has completed a prerequisite if his or her record shows a grade (A through F or P/F) in the NSU system. Students who have not received a grade will be treated as completing a course only if the professor certifies to Student Affairs that the student has satisfied all course requirements other than the exam or final paper/project.

Administrative Law (3 Credits) LAW 0695

Course focusing on the powers and structure of the administrative process in our constitutional system. Specific attention is given to the nature of the powers vested in administrative agencies, the problems of administrative procedure, and the scope of judicial review applicable in the context of agency rule-making and adjudication.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I
Recommended: Federal Jurisdiction

Admiralty (3 Credits) LAW 0800

Course examining the law governing transportation on navigable waters. Topics discussed include: jurisdiction of federal and state courts to hear admiralty and maritime cases; personal injury and wrongful death claims; liability of carriers for damage to cargo; liability and damage arising from maritime collisions; chartering of vessels; salvage; and general average.

ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution) Clinic (8 Credits) LAW 1036

Fall clinic providing student interns with the opportunity to serve as third-party neutrals in dispute resolution. Students register for an in-house placement (LAW 1035 - 4 credits Pass/D/Fail) and two 2-credit courses: a skills and interdisciplinary/policy course (LAW 1037 - 2 credits graded) and a doctrinal law course (LAW 1036 - 2 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

ADR Clinic LAW 1035

ADR Clinic: Interdisciplinary LAW 1037

Advanced Criminal Law: Federal Crimes (2 Credits) LAW 0776

Course examining the prosecution and defense of federal crimes, including racketeering, drug trafficking, bank secrecy, mail fraud, perjury, and obstruction of justice. The course also covers elements of and defenses to substantive crimes and selected issues in the investigative process, such as plea bargaining, immunity, and sentencing.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Evidence

Advanced Legal Analysis Lab (0 Credit) LAW 1013

Required component of the Critical Skills Program, giving students in their final year of law school skills needed to prepare for the bar exam. It consists of weekly labs focusing on areas covered on the multistate portion of the bar exam and tested in multiple choice format.

Advanced Legal Analysis Workshop (0 Credit) LAW 1014

Required component of the Critical Skills Programgiving students in their final year of law school skills needed to prepare for the bar exam. It consists of weekly workshops focusing on areas covered on the state portion of the bar exam and tested in multiple choice and essay format.

Advanced Legal Research Techniques (2 Credits) LAW 0677

Course examining the application of advanced techniques of legal research to complex legal problems. Students develop and perfect their skills in using basic research sources and learn the use of advanced research sources not covered in Lawyering Skills and Values I & II.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law

Advanced Professional Responsibility Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0697

ALSV Workshop exploring ethical and professionalism issues encountered in transactional and litigation practice. Students participate in simulations of disciplinary committee discussions and consider whether a self-regulated disciplinary system is effective.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Professional Responsibility

Advanced Trial Advocacy (3 Credits) LAW 0893

ALSV Workshop building upon the skills students have learned in the basic Trial Advocacy course. The focus is on advanced skills, including difficult witnesses, technology in the courtroom, damages in civil cases, and theory and theme selection. Students conduct direct and cross examinations, introduce evidence, make opening statements and closing arguments, and participate in two trials. The workshop is taught either in semester-long form or in a shorter, more-intensive format.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Evidence and Trial Advocacy

Agency (2 Credits) LAW 0920

Course involving consideration of the ways in which one may incur liability for damages caused by the acts of others, particularly in the business setting, and of those circumstances which make it possible to take advantage of contracts into which one has not personally entered.

American Legal History Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0794

Seminar exploring the intersection of law and history. Depending on the instructor, the course will survey the development of the American legal system; explore a particular historical period or topic; or allow students to select the specific historical issue to be examined. Accordingly, students are strongly encouraged to consult with the instructor prior to enrolling in the course.

American Legal History Seminar Online LAW 0793

Seminar concerning the social and historical development of American lawyers as a professional group; growth of a Colonial bar; anti-lawyer sentiment in the new republic; the rise of professional organizations and a corporate bar; the structure of legal education; popular culture as it helps shape as well as reflect public attitudes toward bench and bar; and stability and crisis in the contemporary period.

Animal Law (2 Credits) LAW 0526

Course examining the law of non-human animals. Topics include litigation concerning companion pets and therapy pets; veterinary malpractice; trusts for non-human beneficiaries; and animal cruelty and neglect statutes. Ethics, policy, and social justice play an important role in class discussions about competing values and viewpoints. As the field develops, the course will also address issues such as the classification of animal rights terrorists as domestic terrorists under the Patriot Act and judicial recognition of higher primates as legal persons.

Animal Law Legislation Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0795

Seminar focusing on state and federal animal protection legislation including the Florida animal cruelty statute, as well as the Animal Welfare Act, Endangered Species Act, Horse Protection Act, Humane Methods of Slaughter Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Shark Finning Prohibition Act,] and Twenty-Eight Hour Law. Students will be required to write a paper identifying and analyzing either a problem with animal protection legislation or a gap in current laws and they must draft a statute or amendment that will resolve the problem or fill in the gap.

Antitrust Law (3 Credits) LAW 1019

Course examining U.S. antitrust laws, principally the Sherman Act and the Clayton Act, and the manner in which the federal courts have interpreted these laws to promote competition

Appellate Practice Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0874

ALSV Workshopexamining the process of appellate advocacy and appellate decisionmaking. Using simulation exercises, students explore whether the record of a completed litigation presents appealable questions and which issues to appeal. They also develop the techniques of effective brief writing and oral argument and learn the theory and practice of law making by appellate adjudication. *Please note that students cannot take both this course and the Judicial Opinion Writing Workshop during the same semester.
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Evidence

Art Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0643

Seminar exploring the impact of traditional legal concepts as they relate to the particular needs of the artist. Topics include destruction, smuggling, and theft of art work; censorship and artistic freedom; and copyright. Not open to students who have taken the Art Law course

Bankruptcy Clinic (4 Credits) LAW 0963

The Bankruptcy Clinic is a one semester, five to six credit course that combines a classroom component with students working on bankruptcy cases. Students enrolled in the Bankruptcy Clinic will represent actual clients in federal bankruptcy proceedings, as permitted by the Florida Limited Practice Act and the Rules of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The classroom component will examine the legal, social and ethical dimensions of bankruptcy law practice; and include instruction in the necessary legal skills and knowledge involved in federal bankruptcy law practice, such as client interviewing, legal analysis, drafting legal documents, arguing motions, professional responsibility, and various practice issues such as the choice of relief under state law or the Bankruptcy Code, relief from the automatic stay, objections to discharge and dischargeability, and confirmation of a chapter 13 plan. Students will also share developments and issues in their cases with other students during the classroom case rounds. A discussion of different cases will expose the other students to issues that may not arise in their cases and involve discussion of ethical concerns and other practice issues.

Pre-requisites: Professional Responsibility, Evidence, Bankruptcy Law. Recommended: Bankruptcy Workshop

Bankruptcy Clinic (1-2 Credits) LAW 0964

The Bankruptcy Clinic is a one semester, four to six credit course that combines a classroom component with students working on bankruptcy cases. Students enrolled in the Bankruptcy Clinic will represent actual clients in federal bankruptcy proceedings, as permitted by the Florida Limited Practice Act and the Rules of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The classroom component will examine the legal, social and ethical dimensions of bankruptcy law practice; and include instruction in the necessary legal skills and knowledge involved in federal bankruptcy law practice, such as client interviewing, legal analysis, drafting legal documents, arguing motions, professional responsibility, and various practice issues such as the choice of relief under state law or the Bankruptcy Code, relief from the automatic stay, objections to discharge and dischargeability, and confirmation of a chapter 13 plan. Students will also share developments and issues in their cases with other students during the classroom case rounds. A discussion of different cases will expose the other students to issues that may not arise in their cases and involve discussion of ethical concerns and other practice issues. The course/clinic is only available to 3Ls (or 3L/4L evening division).

Pre-requisites: Professional Responsibility, Evidence, Bankruptcy Law. Recommended: Bankruptcy Workshop

Bankruptcy Law (3 Credits) LAW 0783

Course surveying the rights and remedies of debtors and creditors in bankruptcy and under state law. Strategic considerations of alternative remedies are emphasized. This is a prerequisite for Bankruptcy Workshop and is not open to students who are taking or have taken Bankruptcy Workshop.

Bankruptcy Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0601

ALSV Workshop examining the rights of creditors and debtors using simulations and exercises. Students assume the role of lawyers involved in bankruptcies and bankruptcy-related proceedings.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Bankruptcy Law

Bioethics Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0897

Seminar exploring legal and ethical issues faced by patients and physicians as a result of developing medical technology. Topics include organ transplantation, genetic engineering, such end of life decisions as physician assisted suicide, reproductive rights including abortion, and experimentation on fetuses and other human subjects.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Business Entities (4 Credits) LAW 0516

Course introducing the law of business organizations, including agency, partnership, limited liability companies, and business corporations. Topics include choice of entity, formation and structure of the entity, power and fiduciary responsibility of management, rights and liabilities of shareholders, corporate capital structure and finance, and shareholders' derivative litigation. Federal securities law is introduced. This is a required second year course for both day and evening students.

Business Planning Workshop (3 Credits) LAW 0807

ALSV Workshop examining business problems, including choice of business entities; formation of corporations; business agreements, such as shareholders' agreements for closely-held corporations; and use of qualified deferred compensation agreements. The course also may cover recapitalizations, mergers, and other reorganizations and divisions. Problems are analyzed using principles of corporate or partnership law and federal tax law.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Business Entities and Income Tax (LAW 0701). Introduction to Income Tax (LAW 0702) does not satisfy the Income Tax prerequisite for this course.

Business Prac Clinic: Prac&Per LAW 0949

Business Practice Clinic Full time (12 Credits) LAW 0947

Fall or Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to develop business skills in a corporate law office, business law firm, or government/administrative legal department under the mentorship of an experienced business law attorney. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0947 - 9 credits Pass/D/Fail for FT placements or LAW 0948 – 3 credits Pass/D/Fail for PT placements) and one 3-credit course (Practice & Perspectives - LAW 0949 - 3 credits Pass/D/Fail).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

Business Practice Clinic Part Time (6 Credits) LAW 0948

Fall or Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to develop business skills in a corporate law office, business law firm, or government/administrative legal department under the mentorship of an experienced business law attorney. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0947 - 9 credits Pass/D/Fail for FT placements or LAW 0948 – 3 credits Pass/D/Fail for PT placements) and one 3-credit course (Practice & Perspectives - LAW 0949 - 3 credits Pass/D/Fail).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

Caribbean Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 4674

This seminar examines the history and structure of Caribbean Legal Systems, its legal institutions, issues in human rights and colonial and post-colonial jurisprudential trends. While the course will focus on the Commonwealth Caribbean and nations associated with the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), it will also explore civil law traditions within the region.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Charitable Organizations Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1051

ALSV Workshop focusing on charitable organizations. Topics covered include choice of entity, formation and dissolution, director’s responsibilities, employees and volunteers, raising and spending money, and tax exemption. Not open to students who are taking or who have taken Nonprofit Organizations Workshop. Students may take this course and Nonprofit Organizations (LAW 0679) either concurrently or in different terms.

Children and Families Clinic - Fall or Winter (12 Credits) LAW 0929

Fall or Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to serve as interns either in the NSU in-house clinic, under the supervision of NSU Law professor-practitioners, or in a legal-aid or government office that provides legal assistance to children and families. Students register for an in-house or external placement (LAW 0929 - 6 credits Pass/D/Fail) and three 2-credit courses: a skills course (Advanced Practice Skills - LAW 0930 - 2 credits graded), a doctrinal course (Clinical Family Law - LAW 0932 - 2 credits graded), and a policy course (Children's Legal Rights - LAW 0931 - 2 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

Children and Families Clinic - Winter Part-Time (6 Credits) LAW 0926

Part-time Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to serve as interns in the NSU in-house clinic, under the supervision of NSU Law professor-practitioners. Students register for the in-house placement (LAW 0926 - 3 credits Pass/D/Fail) and a 3-credit course(Clinical Family Law - LAW 0927 - 3 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

Children and Families Clinic: Adv Prac Skills LAW 0930

Children and Families Clinic: Child Leg Rts LAW 0931

Children and Families Clinic:Clin. Fam Law (2 Credits) LAW 0932

Civil Pre-Trial Practice (3 Credits) LAW 0517

ALSV Workshop involving simulation of the pre-trial process. Students participate in motion hearings and oral depositions. They also draft attorney fee agreements, pleadings, written discovery, motions and accompanying memoranda of law, a final pre-trial order, and jury instructions. This workshop is required for all students in the Litigation Track.
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Evidence

Civil Procedure (4 Credits) LAW 0652

Course introducing the theory and mechanics of enforcing substantive rights through civil litigation. Major concepts emphasized include the jurisdiction of state and federal courts; pleadings and pre-trial motions; discovery; post-trial motions; and the appellate process. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Civil Rights Litigation Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0615

Seminar exploring the history and current scope of 42 USC §§ 1981-1985 as remedies for constitutional deprivations and as a means to enforce statutory rights. The course considers both actions for injunctive relief and actions for damages and examines the defenses available to individual defendants and governmental bodies.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Civil Rights Practice Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 4673

ALSV Workshop is to provide students with a working knowledge of civil rights litigation with respect to law enforcement agencies and the cities or government agencies that employ them. The topics to be covered include pre-suit discovery, as well as, pre-trial and trial litigation.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Collaborative Family Law Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 2005

This ALSV Workshop introduces students to a non-adversarial method of resolving disputes in the Family Law context. Collaborative law is multi-disciplinary in nature; therefore, students would learn how the various professionals interact to resolve problems and issues faced by divorcing or divorced couples. Through reading assignments, class participation, lectures, and role-play simulations, students will learn the basic foundation of Collaborative Family Law practice. The workshop element of the course would allow students to take a hypothetical case from beginning to end.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Family Law, Evidence, and Professional Responsibility
Recommended: Family Law Litigation Workshop

Comparative Corporate Governance Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 1060

Seminar examining and comparing the structure, objectives, and mechanism of corporate governance. The U.S. corporate governance structure is compared with that of England, Germany, and a developing country such as Cameroon in areas such as monitoring and legal compliance, executive compensation, takeovers, derivative litigation and enforcement of director duties, shareholder activism, and competition for corporate chartering.
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Business Entities

Comparative Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0668

Seminar examining and comparing the history, structure, and institutions of civil law, common law, and other legal traditions in Europe, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. In certain years, the seminar may focus on one or more specific legal regimes.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law

Condominium Law (3 Credits) LAW 0866

Course examining the legal and practical considerations in selecting the condominium format of development. The course includes an in-depth look at condominium operations, from board liability and responsibility to enforcement of covenants and restrictions.

Conflict of Laws (3 Credits) LAW 0693

Course emphasizing choice of governing law in cases involving multi-jurisdictional elements. The focus is on analyzing when a court may or should adopt the law of another jurisdiction. Other topics studied include the state's obligation to recognize the judgments of sister states and the limits of personal jurisdiction.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Family Law.

Constitutional Decisionmaking Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0797

Seminar developing an understanding of the dynamics of the judicial decisionmaking processes of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics covered include constitutional treatment of race and gender, presidential powers and the war on terrorism, and the welfare state.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Constitutional Law I (4 Credits) LAW 0625

Course examining the Constitution of the United States, its interpretation, and its application. Topics include developments relating to judicial review of legislative action, problems of federalism, limits on the power of government regulation, and the protection of civil and political rights. This is a required first year course for day students and a required second year course for evening students.

Constitutional Law II (2 Credits) LAW 0629

Course involving in-depth consideration of the federal constitutional protection of freedom of speech and freedom of religion, with emphasis on freedom of speech in the political context. This is a required second year course for day students and a required third year course for evening students.

Construction Law (2 Credits) LAW 0919

Course investigating the construction process and the legal relationships among the participants. Topics include construction contracts, bidding on contracts, contracts with architects and engineers, liens, and responsibility for payment and for defects.

Consumer Protection (3 Credits) LAW 0504

Course examining the regulation of unfair and deceptive trade practices under the common law, the Federal Trade Commission Act, administrative regulations and decisions, policy statements, and the Florida Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act. Students who take this course during a Fall or Winter semester must perform 24 hours of volunteer work at the Broward County Consumer Affairs Department during that semester. Consumer Protection is an internship program when offered in the summer. Students enroll in both a 1-credit course (LAW 2002) and a 2-credit internship (LAW 2003).

Contracts (4 Credits) LAW 0612

Course providing a comprehensive study of the creation, transfer, and termination of contract rights and duties. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Copyrights and Trademarks (3 Credits) LAW 0816

Course examining the protection available for original works of authorship (including literary, artistic, and musical works, as well as computer programs) under the federal Copyright Act, and of the protection available for trademarks under state and federal law. With respect to both copyright and trademark law, we consider: what is potentially protectable, the requirements for protection, the extent of that protection, how infringement is proven, and defenses that may be raised by an alleged infringer.

Corporate Finance (3 Credits) LAW 1047

Course surveying corporate finance and the process of capital formation, debt, preferred stocks, convertible securities, distributions, and acquisitions.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Business Entities

Corporate Tax (3 Credits) LAW 0769

Course examining corporate tax law, including formation, operation, and receipt of recurring and liquidating distributions.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Business Entities and Income Tax (LAW 0701). Introduction to Income Tax (LAW 0702) does not satisfy the Income Tax prerequisite for this course.

Corporate Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0748

ALSV Workshop involving issues that arise in a corporate setting. Depending on the instructor’s focus, which will be announced in advance of registration, this workshop may cover venture capital financing, initial public offerings, reorganizations or mergers, securities arbitration, or other relevant topics. Students will draft documents and engage in role-playing appropriate to the workshop’s focus.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Business Entities
Recommended: Income Tax, Securities Regulation, and Corporate Tax will be helpful if taken before or concurrently with Corporate Workshop.

Criminal Justice Clinic - Fall or Winter (12 Credits) LAW 0933

Fall or Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to intern in a prosecutors or public defenders office, where they learn the practical aspects of trial preparation and may participate in actual trials. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0933 - 6 credits Pass/D/Fail) and three graded 2-credit courses: a skills course (Criminal Justice Clinic Problems - LAW 0935 - 2 credits graded), a doctrinal course (Advanced Criminal Procedure - LAW 0936 - 2 credits graded), and an interdisciplinary/policy course (Psychology and the Criminal Process - LAW 0934 - 2 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites
Recommended: Criminal Pre-Trial Practice

Criminal Justice Clinic: Adv Cr Trial Ad LAW 0936

Criminal Justice Clinic: Problems LAW 0935

Criminal Justice Clinic: Psych & Crim Proc LAW 0934

Criminal Law (4 Credits) LAW 0670

Course examining basic principles of American criminal law: definition of crimes, criminal responsibility, defenses, proof, and punishment. This is a required first year course for day students and a required second year course for evening students.

Criminal Pre-Trial Practice (2 Credits) LAW 0711

ALSV Workshop involving simulation of pre-trial practice in a criminal law context.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, and Evidence

Criminal Procedure (3 Credits) LAW 0645

Course introducing the basic Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment constitutional doctrines that govern the investigative and pre-trial stages of the criminal justice system. Students may use Criminal Procedure to satisfy their two-out-of-three menu requirement. This is a second year preference course for day and evening students.

Current Constitutional Issues Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0796

Seminar examining current issues in American constitutional law. Past topics have included Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Religion, Gender Discrimination, The Patriot Act, AIDS Law, and Racial Discrimination. This seminar may be offered under a different course number tied to a particular constitutional issue.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Defamation, Privacy and Publicity (3 Credits) LAW 0642

Course examining the law relating to economic torts. It covers deceit, defamation, business defamation, product disparagement, interference with contractual obligation, invasion of privacy, abuse of the judicial system, and civil rights torts. The course concludes with a study of issues of current concern, such as tort reform.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Dependency Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 2001

ALSV Workshop examining dependency court practices and procedure governing cases of alleged child abuse and neglect, from filing of the initial shelter petition through termination of parental rights. Through assigned readings, discussions, writing assignments, and simulated dependency hearings, students learn both effective representation of children and case file management. The optional fieldwork portion of this workshop provides students with the opportunity to participate in the representation of children in the Broward County Guardian Ad Litem Program. Not open to students who have taken Guardian Ad Litem (LAW 0808) before Fall 2005.

Domestic Violence Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0694

ALSV Workshop examining domestic violence issues from the perspective of law practice in a variety of doctrinal areas. Areas of coverage may include issues related to family law, civil procedure, evidence, criminal law, constitutional law, tort law, immigration, cross-cultural and same-sex relationships, professional responsibility, and alternative dispute resolution.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Family Law

Education Law Seminar: Higher Education (2 Credits) LAW 0923

Seminar examining the legal issues surrounding colleges and universities. Topics include the creation, operation, and dissolution of schools; the hiring and firing of faculty; and the admission, instruction, and dismissal of students.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of LSV I & II.

Education Law Seminar: K-12 (2 Credits) LAW 0901

Seminar taught in a survey format that begins with an analysis of the fundamental political and philosophical principles underlying the American educational system. The seminar will focus exclusively on current legal problems in elementary/secondary education. Students will then be challenged to apply fundamental educational philosophies to difficult areas of elementary/secondary education such as: the limits of compulsory education; the right to a public education; issues relating to campus safety and privacy; striking the balance between federal control through statutes and state control over curriculum; the rights and responsibilities of students; and the traditional and novel torts in the educational environment.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Completion of LSV I & II and Constitutional Law I & II with a cumulative average of C or better.

Elder Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0737

Seminar involving study of a broad range of doctrinal and policy issues having a strong impact on the elderly in the United States. In addition to focusing on doctrinal law, the seminar employs an interdisciplinary approach to highlight the unique aspects of elder law and emphasize the ethical and professional issues faced by attorneys representing older clients.

Electoral Process (2 Credits) LAW 0602

Course examining the American electoral system. Topics include local governance and the role of political parties, preclearance and the Voting Rights Act, majority rule and minority vote dilution, redistricting, campaign finance, and Bush v. Gore.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Elements of Legal Analysis I (0 Credit) LAW 1088

Fall semester second-year component of the Critical Skills Program. ELA I is mandatory for any student whose overall GPA was below 2.6 after his/her first two semesters of law school. ELA I consists of individualized sessions, small group sessions, workshops, and writing labs, all of which are designed to enhance the skills necessary to successfully complete law school and become licensed to practice law. ELA I is also available to any student in his or her first semester of the second year, regardless of GPA.

Elements of Legal Analysis II (0 Credit) LAW 1089

Winter semester second-year component of the Critical Skills Program. ELA II is mandatory for any student whose overall GPA is below 2.6 after his/her first three semesters of law school. It is also mandatory for any student whose GPA was below 2.60 in each of the first two semesters of law school irrespective of GPA after the third semester of law school. ELA II consists of individualized sessions, small group sessions, workshops, and writing labs, all of which are designed to enhance the skills necessary to successfully complete law school and become licensed to practice law. It is also available for any student in his or her second semester of the second year, regardless of GPA.

Eminent Domain (3 Credits) LAW 1075

Course providing an overview of eminent domain proceedings. Students learn to handle a simple condemnation action and to find, analyze, and apply the law in this area. Topics covered include: authority of the condemning agency to exercise power; public purpose doctrine; necessity for the taking; administrative considerations; order of taking; pre-trial and trial preparation and procedures; and inverse condemnation issues and private property rights protection as they affect the condemnation proceeding. Florida law is addressed as well.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Employee Benefits Law Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1053

ALSV Workshop introducing the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and employee benefit provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. The workshop raises issues encountered by lawyers practicing in the fields of civil rights, domestic relations, bankruptcy, labor, or corporate and securities, through a series of practice-oriented research and drafting assignments regarding retirement, health, and other employee benefit plans.
Recommended: Income Tax

Employment Discrimination (3 Credits) LAW 0633

Course surveying federal law prohibiting discrimination in employment on the basis of race, national origin, sex, age, and disability. The course focuses principally on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and secondarily on the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Reconstruction Era civil rights statutes.

Employment Law (3 Credits) LAW 0632

Course examining the rights of individual employees in mostly non-union settings. The course covers a wide array of federal laws governing most employees, including minimum wage laws, the Family Medical Leave Act, workers' compensation, unemployment compensation, pension law, and employment discrimination law.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Constitutional Law II

Energy Law (2 Credits) LAW 4676

Course exposing students to critical legal and economic issues involved in energy regulation, with a focus on the regulation of electricity. Specifically, the course will examine the history, evolution, and practice of electricity regulation and rate-making. It will consider regulation of "traditional" energy sources, such as coal, natural gas, and nuclear power, as well as the legal aspects of alternative energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. It will also examine state, federal, and international policies intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Entertainment Law (2 Credits) LAW 1048

Course surveying legal doctrines involved in entertainment litigation and transactions, including artistic control, credit and attribution, compensation, and legal issues arising from evolving entertainment technology. Recommended: Copyright or Copyrights and Trademarks. Not open to students who have taken a combined Sports & Entertainment Law course.

Environmental and Land Use Clinic - Fall or Winter (12 Credits) LAW 008X

Fall or Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to serve as interns in-house on complex litigation matters under the supervision of NSU Law professor-practitioners or externally with government offices or private law firms specializing in environmental issues. Students register for an in-house or external placement (LAW 0951 - 6 credits Pass/D/Fail), and three 2-credit courses: a skills course (Environmental and Land Use Practice and Procedure - LAW 0952 - 2 credits graded), a doctrinal course (Advanced Environmental and Land Use Law - LAW 0953 - 2 credits graded), and an interdisciplinary/policy course (Environmental Science and the Lawyering Process - LAW 0954 - 2 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

Environmental Enforcement Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0780

Seminar that surveys those aspects of the law that pertain to the enforcement of environmental laws by federal, state and local government officials and private citizens. The seminar will begin with an introductory overview of some general issues in the field, including questions of environmental federalism, how to measure environmental success, and environmental justice considerations. It will then cover the legal issues that arise from self-reporting of compliance information by regulated entities, and site investigations by government inspectors. From there the seminar will survey legal aspects of administrative enforcement, civil judicial enforcement, enforcement of waste site liability, criminal enforcement and citizen suit enforcement. Finally, the seminar will consider compliance assistance, compliance incentives other than direct enforcement, and various alternatives to traditional enforcement methods. Students will be required to prepare a 25 page term paper on some legal aspect of environmental enforcement. Towards the end of the semester, they will also be required to do a 20 minute presentation to the rest of the seminar regarding their research project. Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Environmental Law (2 Credits) LAW 0771

Course emphasizing federal legislation aimed at controlling pollution and protecting the human environment. Topics include: the nature, effects, and legal control of air and water pollution; regulation of wetlands dredging and development; and protection of land and groundwater from hazardous waste contamination. The course also considers selected common law doctrines, judicial review of agency decisionmaking, and practical issues arising in environmental disputes.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Estate and Gift Tax (3 Credits) LAW 0715

Course providing an intensive examination of the federal estate and gift tax laws, key related income tax provisions, and selected issues of estate law policy.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Wills and Trusts (LAW 0655) or BOTH Wills (LAW 0955) and Trusts (LAW 0956).
Recommended: Income Tax (LAW 0701 or LAW 0702).

Estate Planning Workshop (3 Credits) LAW 0725

ALSV Workshop involving a practice-oriented study of estate planning, including estate, gift, and income tax aspects, with concentrations on the marital deduction and unified credit, use of revocable trusts, and drafting.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Income Tax (LAW 0701); Wills and Trusts (LAW 0655) or BOTH Wills (LAW 0955) and Trusts (LAW 0956). Introduction to Income Tax (LAW 0702) does not satisfy the Income Tax prerequisite for this course.

Evidence (4 Credits) LAW 0614

Course considering rules relating to methods of proof of disputed facts, including competency, privileges, examination of witnesses, relevance, hearsay, and principal rules of exclusion. This is a required second year course for day students and a required third year course for evening students.

Family Law (3 Credits) LAW 0635

Course covering the law regarding the family relationship - including the rights and responsibilities of parents, spouses, grandparents, and children - and the creation and dissolution of the family. Topics include adoption, spouse and child abuse, alimony, property distribution, child support, and child custody. Students may use Family Law to satisfy their two-out-of-three menu requirement. This is a second year preference course for day students and evening students.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Family Law Litigation Workshop (3 Credits) LAW 0686

ALSV Workshop workshop involving issues and problems involved in the litigation of marital dissolutions. Students explore all stages from initial client interview, pre-trial motions, and discovery, through trial, property settlement, and post judgment relief.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Evidence and Family Law

Federal Jurisdiction (3 Credits) LAW 0685

Course examining the jurisdiction of the federal courts. The course considers the source of federal jurisdiction, constitutional and statutory limits, problems of federalism, and appellate and collateral review.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

FLA. Law Certificate Program (0 Credit) LAW 1100

Florida Bar Auxiliary Program (0 Credit) LAW 1200

Florida Constitutional Law (3 Credits) LAW 0775

Course surveying the organic law of the State of Florida, with special emphasis on legislative and executive powers, organization and powers of the judiciary, finance and taxation, and local government. Students also learn the state's history and organizational scheme and the various entities that affect the public and private lives of citizens.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

Florida Land Development Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1016

ALSV Workshop in which students participate in mock permitting hearings and negotiations with respect to a hypothetical land development project in Florida. The workshop introduces students to state, regional, and local permitting processes that are implicated in major land development projects in Florida.

Gambling Law (2 Credits) LAW 0525

Course examining the history, current status, and future prospects of gambling laws in Florida and throughout the United States, with considerable attention devoted to the methods used by states and the federal government to ensure the integrity of the gaming industry and suppress its attendant ills (including compulsive gambling and organized crime). Although the course focuses primarily on casinos, considerable time is spent discussing lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering, and sports bookmaking.

Goodwin Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 1078

Seminar exploring emerging issues of law, led by a faculty member and distinguished experts in law and other disciplines. Past topics have included Tradewinds in Caribbean Law, Securities Law and Policy, International Human Rights in the 21st Century, and Media Intrusion into Private Lives. Students prepare a paper on a topic related to the seminar topic. Registration materials will list the current seminar, which may have a different course number, and any prerequisites or corequisites.

Health Care Compliance (3 Credits) LAW 4682

Course examining the federal and state laws relating to health care compliance, including fraud, anti-kickback, HIPAA/HITECH Act, Stark, federal health care reform legislation, and state law counterparts as applied to transactions and relationships in the health care industry. Prerequisite(s): Health Care Organizations, Regulation and Access

Health Care Organizations, Regulation and Access (3 Credits) LAW 0997

Course surveys the statutes, regulations, cases, legal issues, and policy considerations facing health care professionals, providers, and consumers in a rapidly changing field. Topics include an overview of the American health care enterprise and health care delivery models; the impact of federal health care reform legislation; the regulation of health care institutions for quality and safety; liability of health care institutions; issues relating to access to health care services and health care cost and payment including the duty to provide care, heath care insurance and managed care; ERISA; Medicare and Medicaid; professional relationships and structures; and operational and business aspects including fraud and abuse, competition and antitrust, human subjects research, and technology and the globalization of health care services.

Health Law Workshop (3 Credits) LAW 1044

ALSV Workshop providing hands-on drafting experience along with an examination of the structures for payment of health care costs from three different, but related, perspectives: health insurance and managed care organizations, health care providers (physicians and hospitals) and patients. This workshop covers the history of health insurance and the emergence and structures of managed care, as well as the criticisms of managed care and the developing alternatives. It also considers applicable federal and state laws such as ERISA, the federal HMO Act, and federal health care reform legislation, as well as evolving case law.

Health Policy, Bioethics and Quality of Care (3 Credits) LAW 4677

Course surveys the health law policy considerations, bioethics issues and mechanisms for assuring quality of health care that challenge health care professionals, providers, and consumers in a rapidly changing field. Bioethics topics include death and dying; modern reproductive issues including fetal and maternal decision making, assisted reproduction, cloning and human genetics; justice in health care access and coverage; and organ donation/transplantation. The course also surveys the major mechanisms assuring the quality of health care including regulation of health professionals and related discipline or quality matters; the professional-patient relationship including informed consent, privacy, confidentiality and human subject research; and liability of health professionals and organizations. Not open to students who have taken Health Law, Law 0997

Immigration, Nationality, and Refugee Law (2 Credits) LAW 0723

Course examining the key issues, policies, and regulations governing the entrance of persons into the United States, including status, classification, preferences, asylum, and review.
Recommended: Constitutional Law I and Administrative Law

Income Tax (3 Credits) LAW 0701

Course introducing basic concepts of federal income taxation: gross income; exemptions, deductions, and credits; timing and other problems involving accounting methods; capital gains and losses; and assignment of income. This course is a Fall semester second year preference course for day students and is offered every Fall semester for third and fourth year evening students. This course is a Fall semester second year preference course for day students and is offered every Fall semester for third and fourth year evening students. Not open to students who are taking or have taken Introduction to Income Tax (LAW 0702).

Insurance (3 Credits) LAW 0830

Course examining principles of insurance law and providing an overview of life, fire, casualty, and marine insurance. Topics include negotiation and settlement of insurance claims and frequently litigated conditions and exclusions in insurance contracts.

International Business Transactions (3 Credits) LAW 0837

Course surveying legal issues involved in international commercial transactions. Topics include letters of credit, bills of lading, COGSA, customs, GATT, export regulation, and remedies for unfair international trade practices. The online version (LAW 4837) is subject to the limitations applied to distance learning courses, which are included in the Code of Academic Regulations.

International Law (3 Credits) LAW 0840

Course introducing the international legal system and the way in which international law and international legal institutions shape relations between states. Topics include the legal relationship between nations, the nature and sources of international law, international organizations, the International Court of Justice, and current international law issues.

International Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0843

Seminar dealing with international law and the use of force by states. While the course provides an overview of how public international law has attempted to regulate the resort to war by governments (including WWI, WW2, Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, Panama, the Gulf), it will focus somewhat more specifically on Balkan wars.

International Litigation (3 Credits) LAW 0842

Course examining the special problems that can arise when a U.S. court is called on to decide an international civil dispute. Topics covered include personal and subject matter jurisdiction, service of process, conflicts of law and forum non conveniens, foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine, parallel proceedings, extraterritorial discovery, recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments, and forum selection and arbitration clauses.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law

International Practice Clinic Full Time (12 Credits) LAW 0980

Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to intern with international humanitarian organizations or private law firms specializing in international business law or in immigration law. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0980 - 8 credits Pass/D/Fail for FT placements or LAW 0981 – 4 credits Pass/D/Fail for PT placements), a 3-credit courses (International Legal Practice - LAW 0982 – 3 credit graded), and a 1-credit biweekly course (LAW 0983 1 credit).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

International Practice Clinic Part Time (8 Credits) LAW 0981

Winter clinic giving students an opportunity to intern with international humanitarian organizations or private law firms specializing in international business law or in immigration law. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0980 - 8 credits Pass/D/Fail for FT placements or LAW 0981 – 4 credits Pass/D/Fail for PT placements), a 3-credit courses (International Legal Practice - LAW 0982 – 3 credit graded), and a 1-credit biweekly course (LAW 0983 1 credit).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

International Protection of Human Rights (3 Credits) LAW 0722

Course introducing the institutions and legal framework for the international protection of human rights, including UN and regional systems for human rights protection. The course also focuses on the legal role of the state and the individual in the global community and compares U.S. domestic law with the emerging law of human rights. Not open to students who are taking or have taken the International Protection of Human Rights Seminar (LAW 0617).

International Regulation of Trade (2 Credits) LAW 0514

Course focusing on the international rules and organizations that attempt to regulate trade and investment between nations. Topics include: the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT); the World Trade Organization (WTO); free trade agreements such as NAFTA; customs unions such as the European Union; and U.S. institutions involved with international trade.

International Sales & Arbitration (3 Credits) LAW 0833

Course focusing on a number of selected issues particularly relevant in international sales contracts such as contracts formation, breach, remedies, damages, force majeure and hardship, exemption clauses, etc. These issues will be examined under the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), to some extent the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts). The Arbitration component will introduce students to international commercial arbitration by examining the legal basis for international commercial arbitration, emphasizing the Federal Arbitration Act, the UN Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Awards and the UNCITRAL Model Law and Rules, which form the basis for the rules used by most international arbitration tribunals.

Interviewing and Counseling (2 Credits) LAW 1062

ALSV Workshop examining and developing the skills involved in investigating facts and interviewing and counseling clients. Instructional techniques include readings, discussions, audiovisual presentations, and extensive participation in role-plays and simulations. Students also investigate doctrinal and procedural issues in order to discharge effectively their role in each step of the process. Not open to students who are taking or have taken Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiating (LAW 0665).
Additional Prerequisite(s): None, but Evidence is strongly recommended.

Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiating (3 Credits) LAW 0665

ALSV Workshop examining and developing skills involved in investigating facts, interviewing and counseling clients, settling disputes, and negotiating transactions. Instructional techniques include readings, discussions, audiovisual presentations, and extensive participation in role-plays and simulations. Students also investigate doctrinal, procedural, and evidentiary issues in order to discharge effectively their role in each step of the process. Not open to students who are taking or have taken Negotiating Workshop (LAW 0672), Negotiating Workshop Online (LAW 4672), or Interviewing and Counseling (LAW 1062).
Additional Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Int'l Citator Bd of Editors (0 Credit) LAW 1810

Int'l Citator Staff (0 Credit) LAW 1811

Introduction to EU Law (2 Credits) LAW 1071

Course examining the law and legal structures of the European Union. Topics include: the legislative, administrative, and judicial structure of the EU; allocation of power between EU and member states; relationships with nonmember states; and rights of EU citizens.

Introduction to Spanish Law (1 Credit) LAW 0513

Online course taught in Spanish by professors from the University of Barcelona, introducing different aspects of Spanish law, e.g., constitutional law, civil law, and civil procedure; European community law; and the geography and history of Spain. The course is taught every Fall semester, in a five-week period, following the end of the Selected Topics in Spanish Law course. This is a required course for students interested in participating in the NSU-UB dual degree program. It is an elective for all other students. This course is subject to the limitations applied to distance learning courses, which are included in the Code of Academic Regulations.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Criminal Law, and fluency in Spanish.

Introduction to the Fourth Amendment (0 Credit) LAW 0020

AAMPLE® course that covers the basic principles and arguments concerning the Fourth Amendment and the exclusionary rule using the case method. This course cannot be used in lieu of Criminal Procedure for satisfying the second year menu option.

Jewish Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 1074

Seminar exploring aspects of Jewish law that involve the relationship of human beings to one another and within the context of society. The seminar considers traditional texts, including the Tanakh and the Talmud, and canons of interpretation (legal hermeneutics). Specific topics include criminal law (capital punishment), family law (get or bill of divorce), estate planning (inter vivos and testamentary gifts), debtor-creditor law (prohibition against interest and sabbatical year), humane laws and duties (duty to rescue), and constitutional issues regarding application of Jewish law in the United States.

Judicial Internship (2 Credits) LAW 0734

External placement offering students an opportunity to serve as research clerks to state trial and appellate court judges, federal magistrates, and federal court judges. Students must register for both the Judicial Internship (LAW 0734 - 2 credits Pass/D/Fail) and a Judicial Internship Class (LAW 0719 - 1 credit graded). The class surveys the operation of U.S. courts, the goals and pressures of the judicial system, the function of juries, judicial powers and methods, and the judiciary's role in law reform.

Judicial Internship Class (1 Credit) LAW 0719

External placement offering students an opportunity to serve as research clerks to state trial and appellate court judges, federal magistrates, and federal court judges. Students must register for both the Judicial Internship (LAW 0734 - 2 credits Pass/D/Fail) and a Judicial Internship Class (LAW 0719 - 1 credit graded). The class surveys the operation of U.S. courts, the goals and pressures of the judicial system, the function of juries, judicial powers and methods, and the judiciary's role in law reform.

Judicial Opinion Writing Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0962

Designed for students who are interested in practicing appellate law, including those who would like to intern or clerk for a judge, this workshop focuses on the art of judicial opinion writing. The course will provide a general overview of the following topics: the role of judicial law clerks; the role and function of judicial opinions in our legal system; the judicial decision-making process and the different types of judicial opinions; the structure and anatomy of judicial opinions; and the style and rhetoric of judicial opinions. Against the backdrop of these topics, each student will then be required to prepare a draft judicial opinion after reviewing appellate briefs that have been submitted in an actual case. *Please note that students cannot take both this course and the Appellate Practice Workshop during the same semester.

Jurisprudence Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0735

Seminar examining the relationship between selected areas of western philosophy and the specific concerns of legal philosophy. Topics include knowledge and truth; minds, bodies and persons; ethics and moral responsibility; and philosophy and religion.

Juvenile Law (3 Credits) LAW 0506

Course examining the juvenile justice system, focusing on issues of delinquency, dependency (abuse and neglect), and status offenses (non-criminal misbehavior).
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law

Labor Law (3 Credits) LAW 0750

Course surveying federal law governing labor-management relations, including union representation, collective bargaining, strikes, and lockouts.

Landlord Tenant Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1070

ALSV Workshop continuing the study of landlord and tenant law begun in the basic course on property. Students draft and negotiate a lease in order to gain greater understanding of both commercial and residential relationships.

Law & Psychiatry (3 Credits) LAW 0894

Course that provides students with an opportunity to learn about the relationship between the legal and mental health systems. Topics covered include the professional liability of psychotherapists, issues of confidentiality and mandatory reporting, dangerousness, psychiatrists in the criminal justice system (e.g., competency to stand trial, insanity defense, guilty but mentally ill, mental disorder and specific mens rea elements of crime, disposition of persons found NGRI, competence to be executed), civil commitment, psychopharmacology and the law, rights of those involuntarily civilly committed, psychiatrists and expert testimony, and theories of responsibility (psychological, moral, social, biological, and so forth).

Law and Economics Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0999

A basic definition of economics is the study of the efficient allocation of resources. Central to the field of economics is understanding the use of incentives and disincentives in striving for optimal efficiencies. While it is clear that, whether it be drug law, tort reform, traffic enforcement, or any other area of the law, the laws we live by are based on incentives and disincentives imposed upon us, yet the consequences of these laws can be significantly different than what was intended. It is with this understanding that the importance of economic analysis as applied to the law will be clear.

Law and Literature Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0718

Seminar examining the interrelationship of literature and the law. The seminar considers how attorneys may use literary techniques and devices and how literary themes influence the life and practice of the lawyer. It compares approaches of the law and literature to various problems, noting when the human element can properly serve as a tool for the lawyer. Students learn the need for good writing technique in legal documents. Readings come predominantly from poetry, short stories, and drama.
Additional Prerequisite(s): 2.5 average GPA in Lawyering Skills and Values I & II or an undergraduate major (or higher) in Literature

Law and Medicine Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0895

Seminar examining the interrelationship between the professions of law and medicine in a variety of contexts.

Law of E-commerce (3 Credits) LAW 0500

Course that will provide an introduction to the legal and policy issues raised by electronic commerce. Specifically, the course will discuss the legal requirements of electronic commerce including issues such as jurisdiction, choice of laws and conflict of laws, trademark and domain names, cybersquatting, electronic contracting (i.e., click-wrap and shrink-wrap agreements), electronic auctions, electronic payments, taxation, online dispute resolution, data protection, tort, defamation, constitutional law, online privacy issues, intellectual property, procedural, domestic and international conflicts and regulation.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I; Criminal Law

Law Office Management Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0651

ALSV Workshop providing hands-on experience in the practical aspects of organizing a law practice. The workshop is divided into units covering The Office and Its Technology, Bar Grievances and Attorney Malpractice, Trust Accounting in Florida, Good Billing Practices, Marketing, and Small Firm Survival. Included in these units are concepts useful in litigation and transactional practice, such as corporate structure, real estate contracts, employment procedures, and office infrastructure.
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Professional Responsibility (effective for fall 2009)

Law, Finance & Markets Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 4678

This seminar considers law, regulatory policy, and public finance during critical periods and turning points in U.S. history. Major legal developments, legislative programs and public policies from the perspective of various disciplines will be discussed. Competing theories, doctrines, and models, will be analyzed while testing their validity against empirical evidence and financial market developments. Prerequisite(s): Business Entities
Recommended: Securities Regulation and/or Banking Law

Lawyering Skills and Values I (3 Credits) LAW 0753

Course integrating legal theory with practice, professionalism, and technology in a transactional setting. LSV I combines instruction in legal research, writing, and analysis with other practical lawyering skills while focusing on predictive legal analysis. Case files are used to develop problem-solving strategies, conduct legal research, draft legal memoranda, and negotiate a settlement of a transactional case. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Lawyering Skills and Values II (3 Credits) LAW 0754

Course integrating legal theory with practice, professionalism, and technology in a pre-trial litigation setting. As students work through a case file, they interview clients, draft demand letters, client letters, pleadings and motions, research and write pre-trial memoranda, develop persuasive writing skills, counsel clients, orally argue a motion, and participate in court-ordered mediation. This is a required first year course for day and evening students who have received a passing grade in LSV I. Students who do not receive a passing grade in LSV I during the first year must take LSV II the first time it is offered after they receive a passing grade in LSV I. Prerequisite(s): Passing grade in Lawyering Skills and Values I (LSV I).

Lawyers as Advocates: Rhetoric, Modes of Persuasion & Public Policy Campaigns (2 Credits) LAW 1000

ALSV Workshop designed to analyze how lawyers can change the law in and out of the courtroom. The workshop will analyze classic rhetorical techniques and examine the various modes used to change public opinion. The workshop will dissect different public policy campaigns to teach persuasion by: (1) analyzing the rhetorical strategies used by these campaigns; (2) examining the various methods these campaigns use to impact public policy (i.e., technology, media, protest); and (3) discussing the ethical and moral issues presented by the strategies and methods used by the campaigns. This workshop will also require the students apply these strategies and methods by drafting various persuasive documents and developing a small public policy campaign.

Legal Drafting Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0752

ALSV Workshop in which students prepare documents in the context of ongoing transactions.

Legal Malpractice (2 Credits) LAW 4679

Course examining the prosecution and defense of legal malpractice claims. In addition to exploring the various bases of lawyer liability, the course looks at means for preventing and paying for legal malpractice. Prerequisite(s): Professional Responsibility

Legal Study Skills I (0 Credit) LAW 0523

Fall semester first-year component of the Critical Skills Program, addressing and developing essential skills. Legal Study Skills I begins in Orientation with classes describing the stages of a lawsuit, court structure, case structure, case briefing, and synthesis. It continues through the Fall semester with small group sessions teaching the skills necessary to succeed in the early stages of law school. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Legal Study Skills II (0 Credit) LAW 0527

Students who do not attain a cumulative GPA of 2.70 or better in their first semester must satisfactorily complete Legal Study Skills II. Other students may elect to enroll in Legal Study Skills II. Winter semester first-year component of the Critical Skills Program, addressing and developing essential skills. Legal Study Skills II first entails learning from the first semester exams and reviewing class preparation, note taking, and outlining. It then turns to preparing for exams. This is a required first year course for day and evening students who do not attain a cumulative GPA of 2.70 or better in their first semester.

Legislation Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0859

Seminar focusing on how courts interpret statutes and how the methods and tools of interpretation are related to the process by which statutes come into existence. Each student will write a research paper, present that paper to the group, and participate in a legislative simulation.

Mediation Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0522

ALSV Workshop teaching students the theory of mediation. Students develop and practice mediation skills while observing and mediating actual cases. They also study ethical and legal issues arising from the mediation process and resulting roles and obligations. This workshop is a second year preference course.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 28 credits and a 2.0 GPA

Medical Malpractice (2 Credits) LAW 0873

Course providing students with an overview of medical malpractice litigation from the plaintiff and defendant perspective. In particular, this course will examine the Florida Medical Malpractice statute and other related tort law concepts.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law
Additional Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Evidence

Moot Court (0 Credit) LAW 1814

Negotiating Wksp Online (2 Credits) LAW 4672

ALSV Workshop providing an in-depth analysis of negotiating strategies and styles, with emphasis on negotiating skills through classroom discussion and student participation in negotiation simulations. The online version (LAW 4672) is subject to the limitations applied to distance learning courses, which are included in the Code of Academic Regulations. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiating (LAW 0665). Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Negotiating Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0672

ALSV Workshop providing an in-depth analysis of negotiating strategies and styles, with emphasis on negotiating skills through classroom discussion and student participation in negotiation simulations. The online version (LAW 4672) is subject to the limitations applied to distance learning courses, which are included in the Code of Academic Regulations. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiating (LAW 0665). Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Nonprofit Organizations (3 Credits) LAW 0679

Course examining the following issues related to nonprofit organizations: organization and dissolution, operation and governance, public benefit  organizations, regulation of charitable solicitation, charitable contributions, tax exemption, unrelated business income tax, mutual benefit organizations, and other types of noncharitable, nonprofit organizations. Students may take this course and Charitable Organizations Workshop (LAW 1051) either concurrently or in different terms.

Ocean and Coastal Law (2 Credits) LAW 0503

Course surveying uses of the oceans, coastal zone, and their resources. The course examines emerging law and policy stemming from the Oceans Act of 2000 and evaluates provisions for sustainability, precautionary principles, pollutants, and trade in endangered species. It covers laws such as the Coastal Zone Management Act, international fisheries agreements, the Dolphin-Tuna restrictions, rules for marine preserves, carrying capacity development limits in the Florida Keys, pollution controls of ships and ocean disposal, and legal provisions for restoration of large wetlands.

Patents (2 Credits) LAW 0815

Course examining the law governing the creation, use, and loss of rights in patentable inventions.

Personal Injury Litigation Clinic (12 Credits) LAW 0958

Fall semester clinic giving students opportunities to develop the lawyering skills needed in personal injury litigation. Students are placed in plaintiff and defendant law firms under the supervision of experienced private attorneys who act as their mentors. Students register for an external placement (LAW 0958 - 6 credits Pass/D/Fail) and three 2-credit courses: a skills course (Litigation Skills - LAW 0960 - 2 credits graded), a doctrinal course (Tort Issues - LAW 0961 - 2 credits graded), and an interdisciplinary/policy course (Medicine and the Economics of Tort Damages - LAW 0959 - 2 credits graded).
Additional Prerequisite(s): See Clinic Prerequisites

PI Clinic: Litigation Skills LAW 0960

PI Clinic: Med Econ Tort Dam LAW 0959

PI Clinic: Tort Issues LAW 0961

Post-Conviction Relief Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1001

ALSV Workshop providing hands on experience in post-conviction DNA litigation. Students will learn the legal and scientific principles necessary to litigate post-conviction DNA cases. They review transcripts of real, and sometimes pending, DNA cases, identify potential DNA issues, and draft Motions for Post-Conviction DNA testing. While most in-class discussion focuses on the law in these post-conviction proceedings and the relevant scientific evidence issues, students also learn file maintenance, fact-finding techniques, and appellate practice skills. The workshop is limited to twelve students.

Probate Law Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0713

ALSV Workshop integrating the law of property, trusts, and estates and exploring the administration of estates and the resolution of claims to estates. The workshop will include both doctrinal and practical considerations.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Wills and Trusts. Students can satisfy this prerequisite by completing either the combined Wills and Trusts course (LAW 0655) or BOTH of the separate courses in Wills (LAW 0955) and Trusts (LAW 0956).

Products Liability (3 Credits) LAW 0820

Course examining problems involved in the expanding field of responsibility of manufacturers and distributors with respect to defects in their products.

Professional Responsibility (3 Credits) LAW 0649

Course examining the lawyer's professional role and social responsibilities, emphasizing the Model Rules of Professional Conduct. Topics include disclosure and confidentiality, conflicts of interest, fees, advertising, group legal services, corporate counsel, and pro bono representation. The course also introduces students to the Code of Judicial Conduct. This course is required for graduation.

Property (4 Credits) LAW 0653

Course introducing rights and interests in both real and personal property. Topics include possession, estates in land, landlord and tenant, real estate transactions and finance, and private and governmental control of land use. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Real Estate Transactions (3 Credits) LAW 0865

Course covering the law involved in financing real estate transactions. Transaction topics include the real estate market, purchase and sale contracts, brokers, deeds, recording acts, title assurance, title insurance, and closings. Financing topics include mortgages, foreclosure, alternatives to foreclosure, and deficiency judgments. Advanced financing topics include financing construction and development, mechanics' liens, and alternatives to mortgage financing. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Real Estate Finance - The Basics (LAW 1061) or who took the 2-credit Real Estate Finance Law course before Fall 2005.

Real Property Closing Workshop (3 Credits) LAW 0751

ALSV Workshop developing skills in closing real estate transactions and planning real property related investments. This workshop also covers legal and financial issues in acquiring, constructing, using, and disposing of residential and business properties.

Real Property Complex Transactions Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1151

ALSV Workshop designed to engage students in a practice oriented approach to learning the legal components of and the skills needed for drafting the documentation involved in sophisticated real property transactions. Such transactions typically include, but are not limited to, drafting and negotiating purchase and sale contracts for commercial properties; providing financing for commercial real estate; analyzing and addressing conveyancing issues arising from business entities; leasing issues involved with commercial transactions; analyzing conveyancing issues arising from properties involving subdivisions, shopping centers, and the like; analyzing environmental issues in real property and lending transactions; and recognizing and dealing with the unique features involved with like-kind exchanges.

Regulation of Financial Institutions (3 Credits) LAW 0781

Course that begins with an overview of the business of banking and the role of financial intermediaries. The course will move from there to a treatment of historical, political, and economic perspectives on banking and financial intermediaries. The course will then discuss entry into the business of banking; the Dual Banking System; corporate governance of banks, activities restrictions and limitations on investments; the regulation of deposit taking; safety and soundness regulation and prudential restriction on bank activities; consumer protection and lender liability; mutual funds; consumer protection and capital requirements; insurance and securities powers of banks and nonbanks; affiliations between banks and other companies; examination and enforcement issues; bank failure; and international banking. Prerequisite(s): Business Entities

Remedies (3 Credits) LAW 0755

Course considering legal, equitable, and restitutionary remedies in contract and tort cases; specific performance, reformation, and restitution for unjust enrichment in cases of fraud and mistake; and measure of damages for injury to personal, property, and business interests.

Securities Regulation (3 Credits) LAW 0850

Course examining problems relating to the issuance and distribution of securities with emphasis on federal and state securities regulations, including the Securities Act of 1933 and Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Business Entities. Students with an undergraduate business major or an M.B.A. may take Business Entities as a Corequisite.

Selected Topics in Czech Law (1 Credit) LAW 1700

Course taught in English by a visiting professor from Charles University-Prague. The course introduces aspects of procedural or substantive Czech and European Union law, such as constitutional law, commercial law, law of successions (inheritance), civil procedure, or criminal law. Specific topics will depend on the particular expertise of the professor teaching the course. The course includes consideration of the sources, main characteristics, and legal institutions of Czech and European Union law and public and private laws, rights and obligations of parties under the law, and enforcement aspects of the law. The course will be taught at the beginning of every Fall semester, in a three-week period. This course is required for students interested in participating in the NSU-Charles University semester exchange. It is an elective for all other students.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, and Criminal Law.

Selected Topics in Italian Law (1 Credit) LAW 7000

Course taught in English by a visiting professor from Roma Tre University. The course introduces aspects of procedural or substantive Italian and European Union law, such as constitutional law, commercial law, law of successions (inheritance), civil procedure, or criminal law. Specific topics will depend on the particular expertise of the professor teaching the course. The course includes consideration of the sources, main characteristics, and legal institutions of Italian and European Union law and public and private laws, rights and obligations of parties under the law, and enforcement aspects of the law. The course will be taught at the beginning of every Fall semester, in a three-week period. This course is required for students interested in participating in the NSU-Roma Tre dual degree or semester exchange program. It is an elective for all other students.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, and Criminal Law.

Selected Topics in Spanish Law (1 Credit) LAW 0508

Course taught in Spanish by a visiting professor from the University of Barcelona. The course introduces aspects of procedural or substantive Spanish law, such as constitutional law, commercial law, law of successions (inheritance), civil procedure, or criminal law. Specific topics will depend on the particular expertise of the professor teaching the course. The course includes consideration of the sources, main characteristics, and legal institutions of Spanish law and public and private laws, rights and obligations of parties under the law, and enforcement aspects of the law. The course will be taught at the beginning of every Fall semester, in a three-week period. This course is required for students interested in participating in the NSU-UB dual degree program. It is an elective for all other students.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Criminal Law, and fluency in Spanish

Sentencing Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 1076

ALSV Workshop examining the practical aspects of the law relating to plea negotiations and sentencing guidelines and the application of creative lawyering skills in this most important aspect of representing a client in a criminal case.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, and Evidence

Social Media and the Law (2 Credits) LAW 0090

ALSV Workshop This course will explore the effect of social media on the law. Classes will examine how social media websites like Facebook and Twitter are impacting criminal and civil lawsuits especially in the areas of family law, employment law, defamation, privacy, and intellectual property. Students will learn to apply existing law to the unique legal issues presented by the interplay between social media and the law. Students will also learn how these new technologies, business practices, and social media policies impact transactional and in-house lawyers. This course will also confront the collision between lawyer ethics and the social media as it applies to marketing strategies for lawyers, law firms and clients. Prerequisite(s): All first year courses and Professional Responsibility

Sports Law (2 Credits) LAW 1017

Course introducing the field of sports law by examining the legal rights and responsibilities of fans, agents, coaches, doctors, referees, and reporters.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law and Constitutional Law I. Not open to students who took a combined Sports & Entertainment Law course.

Street Law (2 Credits) LAW 1004

Course and field placement, supervised by a faculty member, providing law students the opportunity to teach a Street Law course in local high schools and middle schools. Law students attend a weekly seminar at the Law Center and teach three hours per week.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Criminal Law, and a 2.0 GPA at pre-registration and when term begins

Student Competition Credits LAW 00FX

Participating students receive credit for work on scholarly publications. Course numbers and credit information for individual publications may be found here. Students who participate only in interscholastic competitions are limited to 4 competition credits. Students who participate on a student publication are limited to 5 publication credits. Students who participate in both types of activity are limited to a total of 5 competition and publication credits.
Additional Prerequisite(s): 2.0 GPA at pre-registration and when term begins (or higher GPA set by organization)

Student Publication Credits LAW 00GX

Participating students receive credit for work on scholarly publications. Course numbers and credit information for individual publications may be found here. Students who participate only in interscholastic competitions are limited to 4 competition credits. Students who participate on a student publication are limited to 5 publication credits. Students who participate in both types of activity are limited to a total of 5 competition and publication credits.
Additional Prerequisite(s): 2.0 GPA at pre-registration and when term begins (or higher GPA set by organization)

Supervised Research (1 Credit) LAW 0814

Independent project involving research and production of a scholarly paper on a selected topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member conversant with the field. This project does not satisfy the graduation writing requirement for any student who began at NSU Law Center after Fall 2002.
Additional Prerequisite(s): 2.0 GPA at pre-registration and when term begins

Supervised Research (2 Credits) LAW 0809

Independent project involving research and production of a scholarly paper on a selected topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member conversant with the field. This project does not satisfy the graduation writing requirement for any student who began at NSU Law Center after Fall 2002
Additional Prerequisite(s): 2.0 GPA at pre-registration and when term begins

Theater Law (2 Credits) LAW 0518

Course surveying the law governing the theater industry. Subjects covered include authorship rights of playwrights, financial rights of investors, employment rights of performers, and attendance rights of audiences. Although the focus is on Broadway shows, Off-Broadway and amateur productions area also considered.

Torts (4 Credits) LAW 0648

Course surveying the traditional and emerging concepts of rights and responsibilities arising from conduct that results in harm to others. This is a required first year course for day and evening students.

Travel Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0521

Seminar introducing current legal issues facing the travel industry, with emphasis on international travel. Selected topics may include legal liabilities of airlines, cruise ship operators, travel agents, innkeepers, and tour operators. Not open to students who have taken the Travel Law course (LAW 0841)

Trial Advocacy (3 Credits) LAW 0890

ALSV Workshop covering the tactics and strategy involved in various phases of civil and criminal trials including opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, use of documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. Extensive use is made of video equipment to tape the daily exercises. Students participate as members of two - person trial teams and participate in two full trials. The workshop is taught either in semester-long form or in a shorter, more-intensive format. Preferences: Winter semester, second year day students; Fall semester, third year day students. Evening students will be offered seats in this course after they have completed all prerequisites. Not open to students who took Intensive Trial Advocacy (LAW 0891) before 2005.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Trusts (2 Credits) LAW 0956

Course examining the rules governing the creation and elements of express trusts, both private and charitable, rights of beneficiaries, termination of trusts, and the duties and liabilities of the trustee. They also study implied trusts, both resulting and constructive. Not open to students who have taken Wills and Trusts (LAW 0655). Students may use Trusts to satisfy their two-out-of-three menu requirement only if they also take the Wills (LAW 0955) class. When offered during the academic year, Trusts is a second year preference course for day students.

UCC: Negotiable Instruments Law (3 Credits) LAW 0691

Course involving a study of Articles 3, 4, and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code, including essentials of negotiability, transfer, superior rights of a holder in due course, defenses, liability on endorsements and warranties, bank collections, and the relationship between bank and customer. The course also explores modern payment media: credit cards, debit cards, and commercial wire transfers.

UCC: Negotiable Instruments Law - AAMPLE® (0 Credit) LAW 1691

AAMPLE® course involving a study of Articles 3, 4 and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code, including essentials of negotiability, transfer, superior rights of a holder in due course, defenses, liability on endorsements and warranties, bank collections, and the relationship between bank and customer. The course also explores modern payment media: credit cards, debit cards, and commercial wire transfers.

UCC: Negotiable Instruments Law – Online (3 Credits) LAW 4691

This course is an online version of UCC: Negotiable Instruments (Law 0691). This course involves an online study of Articles 3, 4, and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code, including essentials of negotiability, transfer, superior rights of a holder in due course, defenses, liability on endorsements and warranties, bank collections, and the relationship between bank and customer. The course also explores modern payment media: credit cards, debit cards, and commercial wire transfers. Not open to students who have take UCC: Negotiable Instruments (Law 0691). The online version (LAW 4691) is subject to the limitations applied to distance learning courses, which are included in the Code of Academic Regulations.

UCC: Sales (2 Credits) LAW 0688

Course surveying the law of sales and leases. The course focuses primarily upon Articles 1, 2, and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code and explores the rights, duties, and liabilities of parties to modern sales and lease transactions.

UCC: Sales And Secured Financing (4 Credits) LAW 4675

This course combines LAW 0688 Sales and LAW 0687 Secured Transactions and surveys the law of sales and leases – Articles 1, 2, and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code as well as the law of secured transactions involving personal property and fixtures - Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. NOT Open to Students who have taken either UCC Sales (Law 0688) or UCC: Secured Transactions (Law 0687).

UCC: Secured Transactions (2 Credits) LAW 0687

Course involving study of Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, focusing principally on secured transactions involving personal property and fixtures. The course explores commercial secured financing relationships and examines the debtor-creditor relationship in state law as well as in bankruptcy.

Veterans Law Clinic – Full time (12 Credits) LAW 4683

ALSV Workshop Fall or Winter clinic (full-time for 12 credits requiring 40 hours a week of work) giving students an opportunity to serve as interns in the NSU in-house Veterans Law clinic providing services to the veteran community in the following practice areas: housing matters, powers of attorney, advanced directives, qualified income trusts and wills, consumer rights, family law, veteran’s court, driver’s license restoration, sealing and expungement, debtor /creditor issues, veterans’ benefits and military upgrades. Clinic students will host workshops in the community were each student will offer advice and counsel to clients on a variety of topics that have been taught in class. This course has a two hour weekly seminar component.

Prerequisite: See Clinic Prerequisites

Veterans Law Clinic – Part Time (6 Credits) LAW 4680

ALSV Workshop Fall or Winter clinic (part-time for 6 credits requiring 20 hours a week of work) giving students an opportunity to serve as interns in the NSU in-house Veterans Law clinic providing services to the veteran community in the following practice areas: housing matters, powers of attorney, advanced directives, qualified income trusts and wills, consumer rights, family law, veteran’s court, driver’s license restoration, sealing and expungement, debtor /creditor issues, veterans’ benefits and military upgrades. Clinic students will host workshops in the community were each student will offer advice and counsel to clients on a variety of topics that have been taught in class. This course has a two hour weekly seminar component.

Prerequisite: See Clinic Prerequisites

Veterans Workshop – Stateside Legal Rights for Veteran and Military Personnel (2 Credits) LAW 4681

ALSV Workshop This ALSV Workshop will examine the unique and often complex legal issues that veterans and military personnel encounter stateside as a result of active duty military service or veteran status. Topics covered: The Uniform Code of Military Justice (veteran status/ discharge military upgrades); USERRA-Uniformed Services Employment and Re-employment Rights for National Guard, Armed Forces, and Reservists (employment issues); Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (consumer issues); military family law; traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (client relations); Department of Veteran Affairs Benefits; women the military/ women veterans; veteran treatment courts; Florida State benefits for veterans and servicemembers. Classes will consist of initial instruction and discussion followed by case scenarios. Hypotheticals will be presented and students will identify, research, and develop the legal issues including interpreting and applying statues, regulations, and case law. Students will gain the necessary knowledge and legal skills involved in analysis of military personnel and veterans¿ rights. Prerequisite(s): All first year courses

Wetlands Regulation Law (2 Credits) LAW 1015

Course surveying wetlands law and regulation at federal, state, and local levels. The course examines the nature and ecological functions of wetlands areas, federal statutes that regulate wetlands dredging and development, and the roles and jurisdiction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the EPA, and other federal agencies and departments. Private property rights, regulatory takings, and mitigation banking will be treated, as will the state environmental resource permit process and certain local wetlands programs.

Wills (2 Credits) LAW 0955

Course examining the law of property transmission upon death through intestate and testate distribution. Topics include execution, alteration, and revocation of wills; rights of immediate family members; and contest of wills. Not open to students who have taken or are taking the 4-credit Wills and Trusts course (LAW 0655). Students may use Wills to satisfy their two-out-of-three menu requirement only if they also take the Trusts course (LAW 0956). When offered during the academic year, Wills is a second year preference course for day students.

Wills and Trusts (4 Credits) LAW 0655

Course examining the law of property transmission through intestate and testate distribution and express and implied trusts. Topics include: execution, alteration, and revocation of wills; rights of immediate family members; contest of wills; creation and elements of express trusts, both private and charitable; rights of beneficiaries; termination of trusts and the duties and liabilities of the trustee; and implied trusts, both resulting and constructive. Not open to students who have taken or are taking the 2-credit Wills course (LAW 0955) or the 2-credit Trusts course (LAW 0956). Students may use Wills and Trusts to satisfy their two-out-of-three menu requirement. This course is a second year preference course for day and evening students.

Wills Drafting Workshop (2 Credits) LAW 0524

ALSV Workshop providing practice drafting provisions commonly found in wills. Topics covered include fiduciary appointments and powers, tax and expense apportionments, beneficiary designations, drafting for special needs beneficiaries, simultaneous death, and common drafting and execution errors. Prerequisite(s): Wills and Trusts (LAW 0655) or Wills (LAW 0955)

Women & the Law Seminar (2 Credits) LAW 0812

Seminar providing a broad perspective of gender issues in a variety of areas the law, including contracts, torts, criminal law, and property and examining various jurisprudential theories regarding gender issues, including the debate regarding formal equality versus substantial equality. Areas of the law such as domestic violence and rape, which are not covered in depth in other courses, will be emphasized. Other issues may include the doctrine of comparable worth, sexual harassment in the work place, sex role stereotypes, the economic consequences of divorce and child custody, biological reproduction, prostitution, and pornography.
Additional Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and Criminal Law

Workers Compensation (3 Credits) LAW 0520

Course considering the statutory, judicial, and administrative aspects of the no-fault system of compensation for workplace-related injuries. The course examines the rights of the employee and the obligations of the employer in light of legislative changes that attempt to balance those rights while considering the rising costs of health care.

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